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not comparing myself to winston churchill but in regard to the lyndon johnson biography we are sort of in the same boat. i have been writing about lyndon johnson so long sometimes people ask me don't you get bored? the answer is the very opposite is true. i don't think of these books as being about lyndon johnson just like a power broker was not about robert moses. just to tell the life of a famous man from the moment i first thought about doing books i thought of biographies, i thought of biographies as a way of examining the great forces that shaped the times they lived in and particularly political power. why is political power so important? we live in a democracy. we have the power of the votes we cast that ballot boxes and the more we know about political power really works not as it is taught in textbooks and high school and college but to ignore naked reality of political power the better our votes should be and the better our countries should be and lyndon johnson is the right man to examine political power. he was such a genius in the use of it, to bend washington to his wi
royalists in the campaign saying i see one-third of the nation. then you look at lyndon johnson. lyndon johnson was probably the most effective legislator ever to live in the white house. how did johnson do that? first by manipulating people and twisting arms, you know, how did lyndon johnson get the civil rights back past clacks she had ever did tricks and every single night. and they would talk through it all and basically ended voting for cloture. i don't think that hillary clinton is going to drink scotch every night but she would basically try to work with people like lindsey graham assuming that he is still in the senate and basically try to create these kinds of collisions. i think that obama thought he had that with john boehner. hillary would have handled it differently i think's. >> susan mcdougal, james carville and what led to the suicide of foster? he has a lot of psychological abnormalities, and he is very manipulative and when he proposed the whitewater deal bill wasn't interested at all that hillary thought of as a very good idea. jim mcdougal is kind of sick. susan mcdo
advantages of integration as john f. kennedy and lyndon johnson to. eisenhower felt this was a difficult till -- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurably to the eisenhower scholarship and i have to agree he was underestimated definitely and i'm so glad that you have written such a powerful book. i think it's fascinating in reading the book to see that more of the book is focused on the military career, even though as you've just spent almost most of your time talking about the incredible eight years of of the eisenhardt registration, the estate leaned over and whispered to me i have never heard the interstate highway system applauded before. pretty exciting. first-time. >> all those people who we
from europe and told him we needed a voting rights act and president lyndon johnson told dr. king to get a vote passed i just signed the civil rights act. dr. martin luther king, jr. can back to atlanta and met with a group of us have is that we will write that act. my organization sncc was already involved in selma, the heart of the black belt. the only time a person could even attempt to register to vote was fired and first monday of each month. you have to vote a set of steps through a set of double doors and get a copy of the so-called, and very few people were able to pass that test. today's lead in february, 1963, 1965, there was a protest in marion alabama 30 miles from selma. marion alabama is the home town of margin of the king jr. and incident occurred. a young man by the name of jimmy jackson tried to protect his mother who was shot by a state trooper and a few days later he died in a hospital and because what happened to him we decided to march from selma to montgomery sunday march 7, 1965 about this time of day, 600 of us have participated in a non-violent workshop an
caro took to write his life on lyndon johnson. [applause] but, of course, he's written four volumes at this point, and i've only done one. one other point, by way of comparison between the two presidents, robert caro does not have to explain who lyndon johnson was. sometimes i have to explain who george kennan was because he was never president of the united states. he was never secretary of state. his highest level position in government of the as ambassador to the soviet union and to yugoslavia. he, himself, would have -- [dogs barking] [laughter] he, himself, would have said these were failed ambassadorships, and, so, why a book on the life of george? my answer, and it's only my answer, it would not be universally agreed with, seems it me, is it's good to write a book about someone who saved western civilization, and while it may be something of an exaggeration to say george kennan saved western civilization, if you think it through, there is a case to be made in this regard because all civilization, in fact, was in peril in the half decade or so of the cold war. anyone in washin
of giving flattery in a way that lyndon johnson would not have bothered to do. there were other people lyndon johnson might have flattered but george f. kennan was not one. >> host: david, rochester in new york, you are on with john lewis gaddis. >> caller: it is an honor to speak with you. a couple years ago a book came out called by hawk and dove, george f. kennan and the history of the cold war written by -- paul's grandson. comment on the relationship between paul and george f. kennan and our george f. kennan was treated in that book. >> guest: i think highly of that book. nick thompson is a friend of mine and we talked about it a lot when he was writing his fourth. he was very helpful in my writing my book but he has a difficult task because i had a vast trove of papers and diaries. paul was a different kind of policymaker. he kept few things on paper. it was in his head. make had to write that from the standpoint of knowing him as a grandfather than from knowing him in the way that i write george f. kennan as a historical figure. i like very much the quote that hall nasa had when
platform. and he loved lyndon johnson. he has an unusual relationship with lbj because he thought what johnson's great society was doing was tremendous, particularly to civil rights acts of '64 and '65. people like roger mudd started cutting their teeth and covering filibusters on civil rights on capitol hill of alike. gant -- dan rather did great work in the south. the openness of the bureau covering civil rights. many might have forgotten named nelson benton. they would do incredible broadcasts. but i would say beyond jim-crow he was a child of the great depression. his father left, so he was raised by a mother. a single mom raising the only child. they were poor. he would have an argument with his mother. mom wants me to eat dog food reverse so broke. his mother said trouble. that did not happen. the point is, it was poverty that he dealt with. he thought what fdr was doing was the way out of it, and he first met fdr, as early as 1928 when the democratic convention was held in houston. and he was such a political junkie, cronkite went to both the democrat and republican conventions
with bobby was toxic, even though johnson can be heard on white house tapes trying to be upbeat on the phone. >> mr. president. >> hi, bobby. >> how are you? >> fine. >> what up close memories do you have of lyndon johnson? >> he wasn't a great bobby fan. >> and visa versa? >> yes. >> all right, we'll leave it at that. >> thank you. >> bobby kennedy broke with lbj to run for president. that ended with his assassination in los angeles. a subject his widow cannot discuss to this day. >> then we lost daddy. >> can we talk about something else? >> mrs. ethel kennedy gave birth today -- >> rory kennedy, the last of 11 kids was born six months after her father was killed, with the whole world watching. >> i told ethel, i think joan and i are going to take this baby home. we think ethel has enough of them. >> you know, i think i just couldn't help smiling. >> ethel's life with bobby was organized bedlam. she was pregnant for an astonishing 99 months of her life. it was a life of children and animals, including 16 dogs at the same time. and a sea lion named sandy who lived in the family swimming poo
with people. >> joanne was here in 1964 when lyndon johnson drove into town and set out his bold vision for tackling poverty and racial inequality. >> i've helped to build the great society. >> the cornerstone was a government program to help the poor and elderly. today, joanne worries that mitt romney would like to dismantle them. >> people need to know that they need those government programs so that they continue that everyone can get help. >> mr. obama does not have an lbj style big vision for his second term. he says his opponent has no vision at all. >> you heard of the new deal, you have heard of the fair deal. mitt romney is trying to sell you a sketchy deal. we are not buying it. >> ohio has benefited from billions of dollars in bailouts for the auto industry. it has won mr. obama a lot of support. >> that affects one in 8 jobs in ohio. i don't think that you can be from ohio and talk about jobs without recognizing that. >> i think that we have some momentum. this will be like a square rather than a wheel. away from the liberal college campuses, they're not so convinced. in a w
of american history until lyndon johnson got it passed, the johnson amendment, with only a voice vote. no discussion through the u.s. senate 58 years ago. it's never been taken to court in 58 years. there's 2,200 attorneys who are prepared to defend this probono. we're just trying to reclaim what we believe is our constitutional right based upon the first amendment. >> are you worried at all? i mean, if the law isn't being enforced by the irs? >> i'm not worried. the law being enforced by the irs. there's two issues on this. one is a legal issue. my attorney friends see it primarily from that light, and i understand that. as a pastor, i see it as a standpoint of the spiritual renewal in america. pastors have backed away from biblical application. if i people on biblical application to permanent life, nobody seems to have a problem with that. if i speak on an application of family life or church life, that's fine, but if i speak on what the scripture has to say about application to national life or community life, then all of a sudden congregants say all over america that, oh, pastor,
a cabinet secretary to lyndon johnson but was the longtime head of the public advocacy group public cause. we are treading the edge of a process. civilization by is of disenchantment. if enough people doubt their society, the whole venture falls apart. we must never let bangerter or political partisanship boehler our vision on that point. we must not to despair the republic. we will tell some tough stories tonight but we must not despair the republic. here we are in the midst of the election and we have to choose a president and congress. an awful lot of people don't trust a party or the political system to work right and we don't really understand how we got to where we are. the truth is we have more questions than answers. i myself did as i started out the work in researching this book. how do we become too americas? how do we stop being an american with shared prosperity and values and shared sense of democracy? how we lose the title of land of opportunity because if you study reasoned sociology you will find people can rise more rapidly, more easily in other countries than in america?
, and he will do it. i remember a statement of lyndon johnson when he was looking around why his party people were not supporting him. he said, hey, they painted their tails white and ran with the antelope. there are a lot of democratic whitetails running with the antelope. not one single democrat has introduced the mondale tax bill into the congress. of course i support the president's economic program and i support him on everything else. i am not sure because of the concept of the vice presidency that if i did not, i would go do what mr. mondale did with jimmy carter, a job away from it. i cannot do that to mr. reagan now, next year, or any other time. i have to much trust in him. i have too much friendship with them. i would feel uncomfortable during that. >> some republicans the criticized saying he disagreed with the decision to impose a grain embargo. have you ever disagree with any decision of the reagan administration? where in your judgment as loyalty and and principal begin? >> i owe my president judgment and loyalty. you cannot have the president of the united states lookin
.. >>> not since lyndon johnson was in the oval office has a team pitched back-to-back shutouts in the world series. two on, one out. prince fielder at the plate. vogelsong gets prince to roll over scutaro. crawford, bell. that's a double play. giants get out of the 1st unscathed. in the 2nd blanco he got him in. deep drive to the gap in right center field. hits the base of the wall and blanco on third standing with an rbi tripling and giants up after -- triple and giants up 2- 0 after two. but, vogelsong got berry and then cabrera the triple crown winner popped it up. crawford puts it away to end the threat. tim lincecum out in the pen in relief of vogelsong just filthy. one of the three strikeouts in two and third innings of work. unhittable right now is timmy. let's go to the 9th. sergio romo in to close it out. the giants take became three 2- 0 and vern glenn is live on the scene in detroit. vern, the tigers' offense so feared coming into the series has been completely silenced. cabrera and fielder, 3-19 as a team they're hitting .165. >> reporter: the reason has been pitching and defense and t
buster posy the >>> not since lyndon johnson was in the oval office has a team pitched back to back. what an honor for the giants' catcher. hunter pence doing his usual fiery pregame pep talk. and it worked. ryan vogelsong ran into trouble in the first inning. two on, one out. prince fielder at the plate. there is your double play. scutaro. and the giants get out of it unscathed. top of the second. hunter pence on third base. hit the base to the ball. blanco on third with an rbi triple as pence scores. now, two batters later, with two outs, brandon crawford sinks one into center field. more lousy defense by detroit. 2-0 lead. now the tigers had their shots. bases loaded in the fifth. but vogelsong got miguel cabrera. the triple crown winner popped it up. vogelsong, five and two-thirds innings of shutout baseball and timmy brilliant out of the bullpen tonight. cabrera breaks his bat. timmy was just filthy. one of these three strikeouts. just unhittable right now. ninth inning, sergio romo in to close it out. he gets omar infante, who foul hits it. giants take game 3, 2-0. let's go live to
a democrat won the state since lyndon johnson in 1964. here, as it is across the state, key groups could make a difference this election, including students and evangelicals. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: bruce springsteen brought his music, a message. >> i'm thankful g.m. is still making cars. [ cheers & applause. >> what would i write about? i would be out of business. >> reporter: and a fervent call to action. >> vote, vote, vote now. >> reporter: the target was students in charlottesville. >> it's been great. it started a lot of great political discussions, a lot of people watching the debates with how close it is. if it wasn't this close there wouldn't be as much of an active political conversation about it. >> reporter: 65 miles south in lynchburg is liberty university, the largest christian university in the world and the largest private school in the commonwealth. >> one of the things that is so exciting for myself as a young person is to see that my vote actually counts. so many times in life, we think maybe, maybe not. but this election we know that our vote counts. >> reporter: liberty laun
, and use their in some policy. most would agree that lyndon johnson on the ticket probably helped kennedy to win. we need to remember that four presidents have died of natural causes in office, four were assassinated, and richard nixon more recently resigned. that is nine vice presidents that ascended to the presidency from martin van buren won upon a time to george h. w. bush more recently -- martin van buren once upon a time to george w. bush more recently. in recent years, the vice presidency has become a dramatically different office than it was when it was created. there used to be a joke about the vice president -- a mother had two sons. one joined the navy and sailed the seven c's, and the other became vice president, and neither was ever heard from again -- one joined the navy and sailed the seven seas and the other became vice president, and neither was ever heard from again. the vice-president has been described as a warm bucket of spit, but it is alleged a different word was used, perhaps one that rhymes with spent -- spit. you could trace it back to jimmy carter's pick of walt
to a close personal advisor to president lyndon johnson. she worked on the war on poverty. she did enormous work in the liaison office with me and carter administration. strong woman advocate and strong in the civil rights movement. one of the most tremendous people i have met in my life. she taught me a life. she died. a lot of us who will miss her terribly, pass on to her daughter tracy and her granddaughter maya you had a wonderful mother and grandmother and couldn't ask for anybody better. sweet woman. i know she is in especially looking down on us now. i'll -- she is in heaven looking down on us. i'll miss her very much. >> kimberly: very sweet. >> eric: i want to let everyone know david axelrod, yes, he did text me and said -- guess what? it's fundraising. over the weekend, yesterday, drew brees broke unitas 52-year-old record. do we have it? hopefully. >> wide open. there it is. drew brees to henderson. >> eric: all right. so the most games in a row with a touchdown pass bay quarterback. 52 years. brady has 37 games in a row currently. he is on brees' heel. good guy, by the way. >> k
-and-a-half years than any other democratic president since lyndon johnson, maybe since fdr. after the midterm he was repudiated and runs as liberal, proud liberal. convention advertised him as liberal. romney campaign has a huge opening in a country 2 to 1, self-identified conservatives and liberals to say you know what? obama is in fact an activist liberal. >> bret: quickly, charles, polls are flashes in time. you get a call, what do you identify now? not are you a republican or democrat. which party do you identify with at this moment? >> look, everybody understands it's not a predictor of election day but it tells you if you compare today with yesterday and the week before, the week before, what you see there is obama was ahead before the convention. now tied. so you see actual -- it isn't only static. it shows the movement for you compare "a" and "b" and "c." movement is for romney. keeps it up, he will win. >> bret: next up, romney foreign policy speech and new revelations about the security in libya. ♪ ♪ >> bret. the president is fond -- >>> the president is fond of saying that the tid
of their position it will take us to a period before lyndon johnson on medicare, and how that effects seniors and their families, and their financial well-being. >> jennifer: i tomed told you guys this would be a therapy session. you heard it here. the president is going to win reelection, fear not. but that doesn't mean you sit on your laurels. >> no. >> jennifer: we have act and organize. just a word quickly about the vice president. some people have been making noise that they are concerned about gaffes being said at the debate. you are not concerned about any of that? >> it amazing me when people get so concerned about a gaffe, when in denver all we heard was misrepresentations, some people would call them lies. i think that's set the president back a bit. but also that he either doesn't know the facts or has decided to ignore them, so to make a big deal out of a gaffe, we could make a big deal out of the deception. >> jennifer: all right. democratic leader, nancy pelosi, and up reflect it's not the championship fight but the vice president debates do tend to provide mo
elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sunbelt. lyndon johnson from texas, richard nixon from california, gerald ford was not even elected vice president. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia, ronald reagan from california, the first george bush from texas and bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election it's in being the four-year period of sunbelt dominance. there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, they came out of the sunbelt and they tended to have a conservative back to them. they tended to be oriented around history of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and the defense of free enterprise politics and also in the sunbelt, and the south and southwest that we see the rise of the 1970s when we come in to talk about religious rights, the rise of evangelical and fundamentalist involve political process in a new political way. thurmond was at the forefront of all of those issues in his own politics on national defense. he was a staunch anti-communist and played an
something about that? yes we can said lyndon johnson. it called for taking more money from rich people and putting it into welfare and job training. i believed. i was in college then as these students are today. my professors told me that the experts in washington had found the solution to poverty. i believed but then i became a reporter and i watched the war on poverty work or not work. i watched as it created a poverty industry lots of victims and bureaucrats who specialized in sucking money out of washington, d.c. over the years most poor people stayed poor. they are still poor. how can that be when we spent so much on poverty programs. >> this year we will spend $1 trillion and over the next decade welfare spending will top $10 trillion. >> that video was made by the republican study committee a group of congressmen worried about governments sending the committee chairman is congressman jim jordan. you want to cut poor people off? >> we want to help them get to a better life. we create programs that help people get to a better life. >> i have heard that before. it by not waving t-
lyndon johnson. to come up and negotiate with us. so when we laid out these goals and timetables and so this is what the women want, they were okay except for the last one. said you can't have a woman senior editor because its management and you can't tell management who to hire. we simply say we're not signing an agreement that doesn't have a woman in the meetings were all the decisions are being made. and so that he finally agreed, and that memorandum of understanding was signed in 1973, and in august of 75 i was appointed to the position as the first woman senior editor. there was enormous progress for women everywhere between 1975 1975-1985, almost every company started hiring women. women were coming out of graduate schools in much greater numbers. we had a woman covering the president, not the first lady of the white house, the white house correspondent covers the president. we had a woman sent to somalia to cover a war. she asked to go to vietnam. they wouldn't let her go. they let it go to somalia. we had a woman covering the iran hostage crisis. and you begin to see women on te
of them, daisy ad with lyndon johnson, city for mayor, john lindsay, there was an upset. one of the things that is happening here, every television station across the country is bought out. no more time for the political ads. people are sitting there and what has happened is they turned off. so many ads thrown at them. can you imagine being undeseeded voter now -- undecided voter? >> dana: a silent ad like that at the dinner table might work. silence makes you look up. >> bob: that is a good point. it may work. it's so different than most political ads. i'm saying that i think people are immune to ads. they had too many of them. they had 12 ads in a row before the 6:00 news. >> dana: colorado. >> greg: eva longoria poor man susan lucci. she retweeted a vulgar tweet and said i don't know why a woman would vote for romney. you have to be stupid to vote for a racist -- i won't say the next word. i'd be fired for it. >> andrea: bob said it. >> greg: then she tweets there must be a bug in the system. sorry if you were offended but it's all about dialogue. >> dana: first, blamed a retweet situat
of the sunbelt. lyndon johnson, from texas. richard nixon, from california. gerald ford was never elected so he doesn't count. he was from michigan. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. the first george bush from texas via connecticut. bill clinton from arkansas, and the second bush from texas. so 2008 is in some ways a watershed election and ends the 40-year period of sunbelt dominance. there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed, that came out of the sunbelt. they tended to have a conservative cast. they tended to be oriented around issued of strong national defense, of an opposition to unions and a defense of free enterprise politics, and also it's in the sunbelt, in the south and southwest, that we see the rise of what -- by the 1970s, the religious right, evangelical and fundamental list voters in the process in a new and important way. so thurmond was at the forefront of all those issues and his own politics. national defense. a staunch anticommunist and played an important role in the -- led him to switch parties in 1964. he was the key figure
president obama was the first democrat to win it since lyndon johnson, in 1964. the population is growing, more diverse now. now the population growth, frankly well to the north of virginia was to his benefit in 2008. right now, the economy here in virginia, pretty good compared to the rest of the country, 8% national. so this is a place democrats hope they could win again. it is tight, they have a very competitive senate race. every vote counts. it is really about the ground game. >> they were going after every single demographic that they can get. young people, old people, women, hispanics. african-american, everybody. they have a pitch for everyone. so you're at washington and lee university in lexington. you're going to be talking to students tonight. talk to me a little bit about the divide between younger and older voters, because i noticed in the mtv interview that the president did, there are differences in what people find between younger and older voters. >> reporter: there sure are, we talked about the demographics, the differences. one of the most fundamentals is actually the
at this period. they'd think of lyndon johnson's paranoia and angry views of the press during the escalation of vietnam and the press turned against him and his angry relations with the press secretary had to do with it and richard nixon and how that led him down the slippery slope to watergate. has he gotten a free ride because he was buddy buddy with some reporters and he reporter -- was a reporter younger in his life and had great relations with some of the press. >> guest: there is a general perception that kennedy's press was quite -- and it was in the beginning. but, as you point out, kennedy knew this world very well. he had been a reporter and efs nation without the media world worked not just about how reporters did their job at how newspaper stayed in business and everything else. he had very close friends who were reporters and editors who he would invite to dinner and invite to the white house for dinner and things like this so he knew this world very very well. at the beginning of this presidency he did have close press coverage frankly but it was around about the summer of 1962
of that, something like lyndon johnson would have done. the image with not just the african-americans but everybody would have been so different. now the president has to do something -- i assume, starting with you, james, romney will be doing something like helping people sandbag at a microlevel in the next couple of days. what should the president be doing, physically? >> first of all, it's clear that in a weird sense that he's going to try to make -- maybe even coin a phrase a necessity out of virtue. he truly believes the right thing to do is stay away from the campaign trail as long as it takes to oversee the federal reaction to this. it may end up being good politics for him but that's what he's going to do. will they decide and one can't expect that, i wouldn't be surprised that even amid this incredible tight race he stays off the campaign trail as long as it takes and that's the right thing to do. >> it wouldn't be surprising, too, and remember the obama campaign has so many young people on the ground volunteering and they are not adverse to the idea of asking peopl
drilling a hole through lyndon johnson's presidency as well as everyday american lives, new york political lowenstein through the halls of capitol hill, [indiscernible] he knew that someone had to raise the moral flag against the war and his first thought was bobby kennedy's office. the first term new york senator understood the rightness of the cause, but knew that throwing his hat in the ring would surely wreck the democratic party and possibly his own career. kennedy suggested south dakota senator george mcgovern, probably the most ardent critic of the war. in recommending his friend, bobby said -- georgia is the most decent man in the senate. as a matter of fact, he's probably the only one. >> nobody dreamed johnson would resign and decide not to run again. i thought since i was up for reelection for the senate, it would be better to get a senator who did not have to forfeit his seat in the senate, so suggested to mccarthy. >> the one thing he was concerned about was the establishment was one to pursue this war, nobody was quick to be there to make a case against the war the democratic
important. during the 1960's, lyndon johnson who was kennedy's vice president joe biden became president. gerald ford had been richard nixon's vice president and became president. the office of the vice-president say is greatly strengthened during the 1960's and 1970's. walter mondale in the late 1970's made the office a substantial base of power when george w. bush was president, we saw with dick cheney that the vice president was a serious figure in washington. he could have impact on issues like national security. why do we not take this issue -- does all this more seriously is a bit of a mystery. it is almost as if we were in the 1920's and 1930's when the office really was insignificant. it no longer is and they are partners in certain respects to the president and will have a larger role as joe biden has in the white house. i think we should scrutinize the more and we should be aware not simply in case they have to become president but as what they will do as vice president. i think it matters a lot and it is too bad that it is treated a little bit like a minor league baseball. eve
to the tax code by lyndon b. johnson. some historians say as a way to silence his critics. attorney jordan laurs, says the law is unconstitutional. >> the irs has no business making a theological determination that certain topics are off limits if you are having church on the weekend. >> reporter: but organizations like americans united for a separation of church special state say the johnson amendment must be upheld to protect the divide between faith and politicians. >> what is at stake is the integrity of churches. churches are not supposed to be political action committees am people don't go to church tow hfer hear to vote for for the city council or president. they go for spiritual solace and to learn about the holy scripture, want to be told who is the best president. >> reporter: this is the fifth year of public freedom sunday. the number of pastors has grown three-fold from just last year. their ultimate goal is to have the irs law declared unconstitutional and the other is to have their kong -- congrigants vote their values on election day. >> shannon: it's a bold move. thank you.
in america in the last half of the 20th century study lyndon johnson's life. it is a way to see what a president can really do. >> chris: robert carol spent almost half his life telling the story of lbj. he says he is a not a power, how. you get it and what you do with it and johnson he says was a genius at both. >> chris: how long did you think it was going to take you? >> i thought about ten years. >> chris: and now we are, what, 36 years into this? >> something like that. >> chris: the breadth and depth of the work is stunning. since 1976, caro has written four books, 3400 pages, winning almost every award there is starting with the pulitzer and not yet to johnson and vietnam. why has it taken so long? when caro looked at how johnson was first elec elected so the e in 1948 by 40 votes he wrote a book about it. >> nobody has ever looked and said this is what a stolen election it. >> chris: and the late evangelicals tells how johnson succeeded john kennedy and saved his agenda. >> he takes legislation that wasn't going to pass civil rights, the tax cut bill and in an in tant johnson
half of the 20th century, sudden, inc. lyndon johnson's life, watching hip exercise power is a way to see what a president can really do. >> chris: robert carroll spent almost half his life telling the story of lbj but he says he's not a biographer, he's a student of power, how you get it and what you do with it. and, johnson, he says, was a genius at both. >> chris: how long did you think it was going to take? >> i... ten years. >> chris: and now, we're, what 36 years into this. >> something like that. >> chris: the breadth and depth of the work is stunning, since 1976 he has written four books, 3400 pages, winning almost every award there is starting with the pulitzer and he's not yet to johnson and vietnam. why has it taken so long? when we he look at how johnson was first elected to the senate in 1948, by 87 votes, he ended up writing a book about it. >> nobody has ever looked at a stolen election from beginning to end. and say, this is where the stolen election is... >> chris: and the latest, "passage of power" tells how johnson succeeded john kennedy and saved his agenda. >>
the other side along. some presidents are better at that than others. lyndon johnson was good at it. >> some people might say the lack of business experience that this president has had has actually been one of the negatives. the reason that we've got persistent unemployment, very little growth in the economy, and $16 trillion in debt, more than $ 1 trillion a year in deficits. >> i don't buy -- people do say that. i don't buy that what so far. i don't think anybody would have done very much better given the hand that president obama was dealt. i think he did mostly the right things. he was not an a-plus manager of the economy. that's for sure. but i think he did pretty well. >> how long does it take to have an impact? at some point, you really can't keep saying i inherited this. at some point it's like, what have you done about it? >> oh, i think the president's hand -- if he's allowed to play his hand early, and president obama did get a bill passed very early -- >> well, he had both sides on his side, right? for the first two years of his presidency, he had all in, you know? he had the le
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